Gear Review: AVAWO Hunting Rifle Bipod

[FULL DISCLOSURE: I received this article free from the vendor for review purposes. Other than the article reviewed I was not paid by the vendor and and the opinion expressed in this review is purely my own]

I use a Remington 700 as my hunting rifle and I currently have a VOKUL bipod that I use when I go hunting that I paid less than $20 for and is perfectly serviceable.  The AVAWO bipod is at roughly the same price point as the VOKUL selling for $17.99 on Amazon at the time of this writing.  As I always do when reviewing products, I tried to research where the item is manufactured.  That I could not easily figure out.  A quick Google search overwhelmingly takes you to Amazon links for the vast array of products sold under the AVAWO brand name.  There is also a company website at http://www.avawo.net/ that has only an email address on the contact page.  A little further digging reveals that the AVAWO brand is a registered trademark in Hong Kong and the US to a holding company called HONGKONG EASYTOP TECHNOLOGY CO., LIMITED incorporated in 2013 in Hong Kong that has registered several brand trademarks.  Since there is no place of manufacture data on the packaging or bipod itself and given the location of the company that owns the trademark, I am left to conclude that the bipod was most likely manufactured in China, which explains the price point quite well.  That does not mean this is not a good product, just that I am a natural cynic and want to know the origin of the products I buy or recommend.

First, the specs of the bipod off the manufacturer’s website:

  • Material: Hardened steel, aluminum; Color: Black; Leg Height: 6″ / 152mm (retracted) –  9″ / 225 mm (fully extended) Light weight: 10ozs
  • Features: Ultra-light spring loaded folding mechanism bipod; Compact and light weight; Non-rust black anodized finish ;Rubber padded on top to protect fore-end of gun
  • Durable with new design high quality that you can quickly attaches to sling swivel stud.
  • Lleg height: 6 to 9 inches.
  • Adjustable leg length (5 settings) with return springs.
  • The legs can be folded forward or backward.
  • Heavy duty and made of hardened steel and aluminum.
  • With a non-rusting black anodized finish.
  • Compact and light weight.
  • Quickly attach or detach from the rifle using the existing swivel stud.
  • This bipod does not have a swivel top and does not tilt from side to side.
  • Adjustable height & foldable arms with spring tension

I got the AVAWO Bipod in the mail and interestingly the box it is package in was labelled as a fishing adjustable swivel holder.  Opening the box, it is packed in bubble wrap and there is no data sheet or instructions for mounting.  Mounting is actually straightforward but if you are a novice and have never messed with a swivel mount bipod I could see how the lack of instructions could lead to confusion as it takes a bit of thought to figure out how to mount the bipod.

Upon unpacking the bipod, I examined it and at first glance it is fairly sturdily constructed.  After closer examination, aside from some minor cosmetic differences such as phillips head screws vs allen head screws, and different types of rubber for the pads, it is exactly the same as the VOKUL bipod I have and not a lot different from the much more expensive Blackwhawk!! Bipods.  I suppose that has a lot do with the fact that form follows function and other than materials and craftsmanship, a bipod is pretty much a bipod.

The legs of the bipod are adjustable and spring load when fully closed such that if you press the release button they spring to fully extended and it is possible to adjust the leg height at roughly 1/2 in interval from fully retracted to fully extended.  It is possible to mount the bipod with the legs either forward or backward on the rifle.  I mount mine with legs forward to keep the fore-grip unobstructed but it is preference thing.  When opened the bipod legs are quite stable.  If you abuse them I am sure they would bend but they are plenty sturdy for typical hunting and target shooting.

The bipod mounts to the rifle easily and is quite stable once tightened down.  I suppose you could loctite the lock down screw to prevent loosening but I do not since I remove the bipod when I clean the rifle.  The sling mount on the bipod fits standard rifle slings, I have a real-tree sling from BassPro and it goes on quite easily.

All in all, this is a great value for the price.  Personally I have issues with it being made in China but if American or European companies insist on pricing themselves out of the casual market then I cannot help them.  I refuse to pay 4-5 times more for a similar quality American product.  I am not rich and I assume most of my readers are not either.  If two products of are equal quality then I will pick the greater value every time, that is basic economics at work.

This is an excellent bipod at an excellent price and if you are looking for a quality, low-priced bipod for a hunting rifle, the AVAWO bipod fits the bill quite nicely.



GOTH Kit – Example

GOTH (Go to Hell) Kit

This post is largely an excerpt from my book: The Simple Survival Smart Book available as paperback, kindle, or audiobook from Amazon.

It struck me recently that I have made several posts in the past about what kits to use/have immediately available in a crisis but I have not posted an example.  This post is an attempt to begin to rectify that.  Let me preface this post by saying that there is tons of advice and checklists available in books and on the internet about the kinds of kits to have, how many, and what to put in them.  This is none example and is the one I have in all my family’s vehicles.

What kit and/or kits each person builds is going to reflect their appreciation of what they need as well as what level of resources they have to devote to preparedness.  There probably is no 100% correct answer when it comes to what to put into a kit as everyone’s needs and requirements are a little different.  I have three kits that I keep prepared at all times.  The GOTH kit that is the subject of this post, a Semi-BOB (Bugout Bag) that I tote around with me everywhere, and a larger BOB Bag based off an ALICE ruck that I keep in the basement if I have to unass the house in a hurry.  The GOTH is not so much a survival kit, although it has that function, as an everyday emergency kit that has everything needed for two people to survive in relative comfort for 24-28 hours except for water of which I always have a ½ gallon or so in my vehicle anyway.

Now, the thing to remember when planning any kit be it GOTH, BOB, or household storage is that there is no single correct answer.  That is because everybody’s needs are different.  Sure, there are general needs that everybody is going to have such as food, clean water, shelter, first aid supplies, and fire making. Everyone is also going to have specific needs that only apply to them such as glasses, medicine, specific dietary requirements, perhaps even disabilities that must be accounted for.  The kit I describe is pretty generic and it works for me because other than wearing glasses I have no specific requirements and I am not going to carry spare glasses in my car kit anyway as I already have a pair in my glove box.

As you plan your kit take care to keep space limitations and absolute necessities in mind.  A mistake that everybody makes when planning kits is taking too much.  In a SHTF scenario too much gear can be just as deadly as too little.  An analogy is the gear soldiers take into combat.  Every new guy to combat tends to tote too much gear.  Gear they don’t need and won’t use but have decided they have got to have.  As you gain experience you start to throw things away or leave it in the rear and strip your gear down to bare essentials.  Since you won’t be able to use your kit in a real-life SHTF scenario until very bad things happen planning and practice will have to make up for the real thing.  If possible, try to do an experiment and live off your gear for a few days to figure out what is essential and what is not.

Lastly, quality matters.  Prepping can be expensive and while it is possible to prep on a budget there are some things you absolutely don’t want to pinch pennies on and water filtration is one of them as are storage food and a good knife.  How ironic would it be if you got everything together, have to use and die from some food or waterborne illness or your blade breaks with no replacement because you decided to go cheap?  Like everything else in life, where survival is concerned nothing beats careful thought, consideration, and planning.

EXCERPT BEGINS HERE:

This compact kit can be carried in the car, on the boat, or in a small ruck/backpack while hunting, hiking, exploring, etc.  Most of the contents will fit in an Army 7.62mm ammo can which doubles as a pot for melting snow and device with which to dig an emergency snow shelter. (However, if you can carry it, include a small shovel.  It is far, far better than trying to use an ammo can.)

GOTH Kit laid out

Carrying container

  • US Army Surplus 7.62mm ammo can (can be purchased at local Army Surplus tore or online)

General Items

  • 550 Parachute Cord (25 feet)
  • Signal Mirror
  • Matches (2 boxes)
  • Magnesium Fire Starter
  • Bic® Lighter
  • 40 Alcohol prep-pads for first-aid & use as fire starters
  • Compass (learn how to use)
  • Paper and pencil
  • Fishing line, hooks, split shot leads
  • Pocketknife
  • P-38 GI Can Opener
  • Money
  • Garbage Bags (3 large size bags)
  • Dental floss (It’s strong and useful as thread for sewing, fishing line, or for lashing branches for improvised shelters.)
  • Gardening Hand-Shovel (carried externally)

First Aid Kit (Recommended contents)

  • Moleskin
  • Sterile pads (2 x 2 and 4 x 4)
  • Sterile Gauze
  • Neosporin
  • Band-Aids
  • Aspirin
  • First Aid Tape

Food & Water

  • Water Filter Straw
  • Iodine Water Purification Tablets
  • Emergency Rations (3 day supply for one person)

Optional/Nice to Have Items

  • Instant Soup or tea (3-4 packages)
  • Camp Cup/Canteen Cup
  • Emergency Wire Saw
  • Emergency Tent
  • Campfire starter sticks (optional)

GOTH Kit packed

All contents will fit in a US Army Surplus ammo can, I use a 7.62mm can that I have from long ago. It is waterproof and closes very securely.  If there is extra room (there should not be) you can keep things from rattling in the can by wadding up some wax paper and stuffing it around the items.  The wax paper stays dry and also doubles as a fire starter.

My G.O.T.H. Kit weighs 8.5 lbs. and the ammo can fits perfectly behind the back seat of my pickup.

I have recently started a new project taking select military FMs and TMs in the public domain that are available as PDFs but hard to find and/or expensive as hardcopies and releasing them as affordable hardcopies for people to add to their prepping libraries. Let’s face it, if the SHTF one of the first things to disappear will be the internet and shortly after that electronics will run out of juice without reliable electricity. The advantage of hardcopies is paper doesn’t have to be recharged.
I have the first ff these already available. It is the Operator’s and Direct Maintenance manuals for the M1911A1 .45 pistol. The -12 and -35 in army parlance it is available through Createspace at: https://www.createspace.com/6456315
The next will be FM 23-35 Combat Training with Pistols and Revolvers from Oct 88. I will probably be releasing these at the rate of one every other month or so for a while as I have a list of about 30 manuals I would like to make available. There is a dizzying array of manuals that the military has put together over the years and not all of them deal directly with closing with and destroying the enemy. Many are directly relatable to non-combat prepping tasks. I will primarily be using the Army versions of these manuals because they are what I personally am most familiar with.
If anyone has ideas for good manuals that should be available as hardcopies but are not lets discuss which ones should be out there. Thoughts?

NAT Geo just made all USGS maps easily printable from Home

I posted about free downloadable USGS maps of the United States last year here: USGS Topo Maps for Free.  The official USGS site is great for finding accurate small-scale (1:24,000) topo maps of whatever part of the US you would like to have.  The problem with the site, or at least the maps you can get is that they don’t easily print at home because the sheets are sized for large format printers that are typically only found at commercial printing centers forcing you to download the files and pay to have them printed.

National Geographic Maps Page

National Geographic Maps Page

National Geographic has fixed that with the debut of a new site on their page called PDF Quads that lets you search for and download home-printable copies of every USGS quad for the US.  NatGeo has packaged each quad into a 5-page package that includes:

  • Page 1 is an overview map showing the Quad in context
  • Pages 2 through 5 are the standard USGS Quads cut in quarters to fit on standard printers
  • Hillshading has been added to each page of the PDF to help visualize the topography

They are sized such that you can print them from home, cut off the white edges, and tape them together to have a navigation ready map of the quad you want.  The page includes and interactive, zoomable map similar to the google maps interface that lets you quickly find the map quad you are looking for and download it.  I have included the PDF file for Mine Mountain in the Nevada test site so you can look at it and see what the NatGeo file looks like.

To repeat, the link to the NatGeo maps page is PDF Quads.

Mine Mountain Map PDF file

I am on the lookout for map products as useful the USGS quads for the rest of the world but while there are some good map sites out there, I have yet to fins free map products anywhere else in the world that come even close to matching what the USGS provides for the United States.  If anyone knows of some good sites please eave a comment.

Gear Review: Beileshi All in One .22 to .50 Caliber Rifle Gauge Red Dot Laser Bore Sighter Boresight

At first glance I thought this was going to be a good product. I received it in a cardboard box with foam inserts with slots cut out for all the separate components.  I put it together, installed the batteries, and checked it for initial function at home and everything worked first time out of the box.

How the boresight comes packaged.

How the boresight comes packaged.

There are instructions included with the boresight but at best they are rudimentary and do not go into how to use the boresight to sight in a rifle.  The instructions essentially tell you how to install the batteries and turn the laser on and off.

I finally got it out to the range this past weekend. The boresight comes with 4 different inserts that attach to the bore end of the scope to ensure a good fit in the barrel and accurate boresight. I got out to the range to boresight my .308 Remington 700 and the new scope I just got. I placed my rifle on the gun stand, sighted on the target with the iron sights, mounted the scope, selected the barrel insert, inserted the boresight into the barrel and then looked though the scope to try and find the laser dot to boresight off of. No dot in sight. I then reverted to a trick I used in the army when using similar laser boresights. I took a piece of paper and held it in front of the barrel to find the dot then started walking downrange to see where the dot was at. Luckily this is a visible instead of an IR laser so I did not need any NVG’s to fins the dot. Needless to say, the laser dot was roughly 10 target forms right of my aim point with my zeroed iron sights at 25m.

The unpackaged boresight ready for use

The unpackaged boresight ready for use

I initially thought that I had inserted the boresight incorrectly so I went back and checked it out, rotated the boresight in the bore to see if the laser would line up, I even got a guy waiting behind me in line to try the boresight in his 30 .06 and he got the same result. Then to top it all off, I thought maybe the rubber insert was not tight enough so I use the proved screwdriver to tighten it down a little bit and reinserted it into the rifle but was still nowhere near my known aim point. At this point I gave up and went to remove the boresight whereupon the rubber insert slipped off the small screw and became lodged in the barrel of my rifle. Luckily, I never go to the range without a cleaning kit and barrel rod so was able to push it out of the barrel whereupon I zeroed my scope the old fashioned way by pulling my zero target in close enough to get on the paper then making adjustments and firing at progressively longer ranges until I got it zeroed at my desired range of 150m.

A few things; I don’t expect a laser boresight dot to align with my aim point on a zeroed weapon, indeed I would be amazed if it did. I did however expect it to be somewhere in the ballpark maybe ½ to 1 target forms off of a zeroed aim point. It did not achieve that and thus was useless from the standpoint of boresighting my rifle. A boresight that does not align with the barrel is of no use. It gets one star because I cannot give it zero and at least the laser works even though it does not align with the barrel as it is supposed to do. You never know, I may just have gotten a defective boresight.
On the bright side, I can use the laser to irritate the neighbor’s cat since I certainly cannot use it to boresight a weapon as it was designed to do.

At first glance I thought this was going to be a good product. I finally got it out to the range this past weekend. The boresight comes with 4 different inserts that attach to the bore end of the scope to ensure a good fit in the barrel and accurate boresight. I got out to the range to boresight my .308 Remington 700 and the new scope I just got. I placed my rifle on the gun stand, sighted on the target with the iron sights, mounted the scope, selected the barrel insert, inserted the boresight into the barrel and then looked though the scope to try and find the laser dot to boresight off of. No dot in sight. I then reverted to a trick I used in the army when using similar laser boresights. I took a piece of paper and held it in front of the barrel to find the dot then started walking downrange to see where the dot was at. Luckily this is a visible instead of an IR laser so I did not need any NVG’s to fins the dot. Needless to say, the laser dot was roughly 10 target forms right of my aim point with my zeroed iron sights at 25m. I initially thought that I had inserted the boresight incorrectly so I went back and checked it out, I even got a guy waiting behind me in line to try the boresight in his 30 .06 and he got the same result. Then to top it all off, I thought maybe the rubber insert was not tight enough so I use the proved screwdriver to tighten it down a little bit and reinserted it into the rifle but was still nowhere near my known aim point. At this point I gave up and went to remove the boresight whereupon the rubber insert slipped off the small screw and became lodged in the barrel of my rifle. Luckily, I never go to the range without a cleaning kit and barrel rod so was able to push it out of the barrel whereupon I zeroed my scope the old fashioned way by pulling my zero target in close enough to get on the paper then making adjustments and firing at progressively longer ranges until I got it zeroed at my desired range of 150m.

A few things; I don’t expect a laser boresight dot to align with my aim point on a zeroed weapon, indeed I would be amazed if it did. I did however expect it to be somewhere in the ballpark maybe ½ to 1 target forms off of a zeroed aim point. It did not achieve that and thus was useless from the standpoint of boresighting my rifle. A boresight that does not align with the barrel is of no use. It gets one star because I cannot give it zero and at least the laser works even though it does not align with the barrel as it is supposed to do. You never know, I may just have gotten a defective boresight.

On the bright side, I can use the laser to irritate the neighbor’s cat since I certainly cannot use it to boresight a weapon as it was designed to do.

I initially posted this review on Amazon in early June, 2016 and within 24 hours the company that makes the boresight contacted me and offered to replace the product at their cost if I were willing to revise my review upon receipt of the new product.  I have not yet received the new boresight but when I do I will take it out ot the range and update both here and on Amazon.  At a minimum I am impressed with the responsiveness of the manufacturer.

Update # 1 29 June, 2016 – The seller contacted me after this review went live and offered to send me a free replacement which I just got in the mail yesterday. I plan on taking the new boresight out to the range in the next few weeks and try it out to see if it works any better than the first one I got. I will post another update then and perhaps change my rating depending on how it goes.

Final Update – 8 July, 2016 – I got the new boresight out, put it together, and tried to use it.  This boresight works.

Old and new boresights together

Old and new boresights together

First let me explain how a boresight works.  The boresight is supposed to help you align adjustable sights, whether open/iron or a scope, with the barrel of the weapon such that when you shoot using proper techniques you are closer to zero than starting from mechanical/manufacturer set zero or if you have somehow knocked your sights out of alignment.  Boresighting and zeroing are two entirely different things.  Zeroing aligns your sights, the way you hold the weapon, and your line of sight such that the strike of the bullet aligns with the iron sights or scope crosshairs.  A boresighted rifle is not zeroed, you still have to take the weapon out to the range and fine tune the alignment because it is very rare that mechanical and personal zero are the same thing, I have only ever known one person who could pick up a mechanically zeroed rifle and be zeroed herself.

View through the eyepiece of my scope, the laser dot did not show up as anything but a washed out part of the picture so I added a dot where the laser dot was at so you could see where the laser was in relation to the crosshairs of my scope

View through the eyepiece of my scope, the laser dot did not show up as anything but a washed out part of the picture so I added a dot where the laser dot was at so you could see where the laser was in relation to the crosshairs of my scope

I did not expect to boresight and go shoot hitting the x-ring every time without having to additionally zero the weapon.  As detailed above, my first experience with this boresight was disappointing to say the least.

I played around with it a bit because I still had problems and I think I have diagnosed the problem with it.  As stated above I have a Remington 700 in .308.  There are four different size rubber inserts that come with the boresight.  You are supposed to choose the appropriate size insert and screw it into the end of the boresighter so that the boresight has a tight fit and aligns properly with the barrel.  One of the problems with this is that in order to get a tight fit on my .308 I had to use the insert that says it is for .350-.434 cal weapons, the insert for .280-.349 cal just does not quite get tight enough to provide a stable seat in the barrel.  Given that .30 cal/7.62mm is one of the most common calibers in the world it floors me that they don’t have an insert for that caliber in the kit or at least one that I could buy separately.

Boresight inserted into the end of the barrel

Boresight inserted into the end of the barrel

Be that as it may, I selected the .350-.434 cal insert and screwed it very loosely onto the boresight and then put it into the barrel pushing until the boresight was firmly seated and had as little play around the end of the barrel as possible.  Then I turned it on.  I had my rifle on a gun rest to keep it stable and put the crosshairs of my already zeroed scope on the target.  Initially the dot was at least on the paper but several target forms left.  I rotated the boresight 90 degrees and it brought the dot ½ target form right and ½ target forms down from the aimpoint.  I assume I did not have it seated as tight as I should have at first and rotating the boresight seated it fully.  Since I am not going to adjust my sight I just wanted to confirm that the new boresight actually works.

I then went to remove the boresight from the barrel and the fun began.  Just like with the first one, the rubber insert popped off the screw on the boresight and stayed lodged in the barrel.  Not so bad this time as I was prepared for it and already had my cleaning rod put together and just pushed it out.  I will have to rod the barrel with patches a couple times to ensure there is no rubber caught in it but I can live with that.

Before insertion in the barrel

Before insertion in the barrel

After removing from the barrel.  Note the rubber insert pulled off the retaining screw

After removing from the barrel. Note the rubber insert pulled off the retaining screw

I started thinking about ways that the problem could be fixed and came up with two solutions.  The most obvious and probably cheapest fix from a manufacturer perspective to me would be to have small washers slightly smaller than the minimum caliber size of the inserts to ensure that the insert does not come off and lodge in the barrel.  The other would be to have exact caliber inserts available as additional purchase items.  This is not actually a bad piece of equipment and the price is just about unbeatable for a multi-caliber boresight.  A few modifications and this would easily get 5 stars.  I have adjusted my rating to 4 stars mainly because the first one I got was garbage and even with the second some patience and knowledge of actual boresighting procedures is necessary because the instructions are essentially worthless, and lastly because the inserts still get stuck in the barrel, which I find extremely annoying.

I have attached several pictures to the review.  The first two were in the original review and are of the boresight as I got it.  The 3rd is the old and new boresights together.  The 4th is the view through the eyepiece of my scope, the laser dot sis not show up as anything but a washed out part of the picture so I added a dot where the laser dot was at so you could see where the laser was in relation to the crosshairs of my scope.  The 5th is a picture of the boresight inserted into the end of the barrel. The 6th and 7th are picture of the rubber insert before and after I put the boresight into my rifle.  This is so you can see where it attaches and how it popped off the little retaining screw when I removed it from the rifle.

After all I have been through with this I now like it and think it is a good value for the price.  You do have to be aware that there may be issues with it and it requires a little finesse when using it, I finally got a serviceable boresight but it turned out to take longer and be more painful than I originally thought it would when I spotted this little bargain.

Gear Review: Dry-sacks – 20l Outdoor Research and multi-size Outdoor Products

I actually have two different brands of drysacks. I have two 20l Outdoor Research dry sacks and a three-pack of Outdoor Products multiple size dry sacks in 2.1l, 4.1l, and 7.9l sizes. I will review them in order.

The Outdoor Research bags are pricier than the Outdoor Products bags at almost $30 a piece but for the price they are extremely durable and of heavy-duty construction. They are also waterproof to the point where you can submerge them completely and they remain dry inside. I would even guess that one of these could be used as an emergency flotation device if you needed one. I tested my first one of these by weighing it down with a t-shirt wrapped brick and a few wads of toilet paper inside and leaving it submerged in the creek behind my house over the weekend. It stayed bone dry on the inside over the weekend.

20l Outdoor Research Dry sack. The ruler is a standard 12in school ruler.

20l Outdoor Research Dry sack. The ruler is a standard 12in school ruler.

I have two because I use these as my main dry sack for inside mine and my wife’s BOB bags. I have used other Outdoor Research gear over the years and never been anything but impressed. I had a 30l dry sack for over ten years that I always took to the field with me because it was better than the Army issue dry sack. Unfortunately, the dry sack was not shrapnel proof and a too close IED in Iraq put paid to that one.

One thing in particular that I like about the Outdoor research bags is that they have nylon loops on the outside so that you can attach your dry sack to the outside of your ruck if needed. I personally have mine on the inside right now but like the fact that the loops provide the versatility of keeping the sack if I need my main ruck compartment for something else.

I wholeheartedly recommend the Outdoor research dry sack if you want a durable, heavy duty dry sack to keep your essential gear dry that won’t break the bank. They are made of durable material and the robust construction shows the quality of the bag throughout. It is available in multiple sizes so you can get the size you need for your particular setup. A great bag.

Now to the second set of bags. Outdoor research also has three-pack of ditty bad dry sacks that were almost twice as expensive as the Outdoor Products ones when I bought mine. At the time of writing the Outdoor Products 3-Pack Dry Sack go for $16.00 and the Outdoor Research Dry Ditty Sacks three-pack is $31.00. When I bought mine the Outdoor Products bags were $10.00.

The Three Outdoor Products dry sacks. The ruler is a standard 12in school ruler

The Three Outdoor Products dry sacks. The ruler is a standard 12in school ruler

When I first got them I thought they were kind of flimsily constructed and was very skeptical on how well they would work. I did the same test with them as I did with my 20l bag and to my surprise the contents stayed dry even though they are specifically advertised as being not suitable for submersion.

They are made of a nylon weave and fairly thin which makes them super light compared to my other bags. The three sizes are useful as you can use the size you need instead of using more bag than necessary. I would be careful about putting anything with sharp points or edges into these bags but they are great for keeping spare socks and a t-shirt dry without taking up a ton of space.

I like these bags as they are lightweight and it is easy to carry an empty one as a spare without sacrificing space. I have only had these about six months and have not really used the hell out of them yet but am not sure they will last in the long run as I am sure my Outdoor research bag will. These are a good interim choice if you are on a budget but I would plan on buying more expensive but also more durable bags in the future as you continually improve your kit.


Gear Review: 1 Liter Nalgene Bottle with Human Gear cap

I have had my current 1 liter/quart Nalgene Water Bottlefor a little over 2 ½ years now and have absolutely nothing to complain about. I did replace the lid that comes with the bottle with a Humangear cap. The cap I use is not compatible with tubed hydration systems. That is mainly because I hate CamelBaksand everything similar. I must have 4-5 different backpack hydration systems in my basement gear room that I got during my military career and one that I bought on the civilian market and I uniformly dislike them all. It is not that they are inconvenient, they are extremely convenient. My problem with backpack style hydration bladder systems is that they are so damn hard to keep clean. I had serious problems trying to keep mine clean in Iraq where I had a secure FOB and at least rudimentary facilities. I cannot imagine how difficult it would be to keep one clean and hygienic in a bug-out situation where civilized facilities are plain unavailable or erratically available at best.

Therefore, I went with this bottle. I have two of them and a garden variety 2-quart Mil-Spec canteen in a MOLLE pouch attached to my BOB. I won’t even bother reviewing the 2-quart as it has been around for decades and is battle tested. If you buy a Mil-Spec canteen you cannot go wrong.

Back to the Nalgene bottle though. As I said, the cap I have is actually a cap with a cap on it. That is it has a smaller cap on top that is more appropriately sized for drinking directly from the bottle. I have used this bottle every day to take a drink when I go to work and also when zi go on day hikes with the wife. The great thing about Nalgene is that it does not take odors. If you ever used an old army plastic canteen you know that as soon as you put kool-aid or something else in the canteen you are cursed to always have a slimy taste in the water no matter how much you wash it. That is not the case with Nalgene. I have put all kinds of stuff in my bottle from Tang to coffee and just plain water. It simply does not absorb odors, which I love. The bottle itself is almost indestructible. I have dropped it 20 feet onto rocks and all it got were some scratches.

The Bottle and accessories I tote on my daypack

The Bottle and accessories I tote on my daypack

I love this bottle and consider it an essential item. It is has a more economical shape than a regular canteen for attachment to my Bob and the Rothco Molle Water Bottle Pouch and Bottle Mug I use are extremely practical designs as well.

If you are looking for a water bottle to add to your BOB or just your daypack then you cannot go far wrong getting this extremely durable and functional bottle. It is so great it makes me wonder why the military sticks with the crappy designed canteen they have.


What is a BOB? and I am Back.

I ran across this piece on Task & Purpose not too long ago and it has a very down to earth appreciation of what a BOB is and is not.  There is a lot of confusion of what should and should not go into a BOB and the author lays out the planning considerations for a BOB very nicely.

Here’s the Link: A Survival Expert Lays Out What You Need In Your Bug-Out Bag

A Side Note: I realize I have been remiss in posting recently but I am going to try and get better at it.  I have some more reviews I am working on and hopefully life will get less hectic letting me post more here.  Simple Survival is my secondary site as I concentrate on my passion for history at Battles & Book Reviews, my main site.  I have not forgotten this site though and am starting to work on some more product reviews and some other stuff that should start going up soon though probably not with the frequency I used to have.

USGS Topo Maps for Free

Did you know you can get USGS Topographic Maps for free?  I didn’t either until I started screwing around on the web looking for maps.  The place to go is the USGS Map Locator & Downloader.  From that page you can find the map you want and download it to your computer or device for browsing or printing.  The interface is quite simple and and it is easy to download.  You can either print the maps out at home or take the file to a print shop and you can get the whole sheet printed on a plotter so you can laminate it.  I even found a shop near me that will print large maps on waterproof material so I don’t have to screw around laminating them and making them bulkier than they need to be.

The USGS Map Locator interface page

The USGS Map Locator interface page

The “two is one and one is none” fallacy

I ran across a very interesting article about not just the importance of redundancy but why having the right type of redundancy in your gear is critical.  http://graywolfsurvival.com/208978/the-two-is-one-and-one-is-none-fallacy/ The article makes the very good point that having two of the same item is not very effective if said item works perfectly fine but is not appropriate for the conditions in which it is being used.

 

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