Gear Review: Beileshi All in One .22 to .50 Caliber Rifle Gauge Red Dot Laser Bore Sighter Boresight

At first glance I thought this was going to be a good product. I received it in a cardboard box with foam inserts with slots cut out for all the separate components.  I put it together, installed the batteries, and checked it for initial function at home and everything worked first time out of the box.

How the boresight comes packaged.
How the boresight comes packaged.

There are instructions included with the boresight but at best they are rudimentary and do not go into how to use the boresight to sight in a rifle.  The instructions essentially tell you how to install the batteries and turn the laser on and off.

I finally got it out to the range this past weekend. The boresight comes with 4 different inserts that attach to the bore end of the scope to ensure a good fit in the barrel and accurate boresight. I got out to the range to boresight my .308 Remington 700 and the new scope I just got. I placed my rifle on the gun stand, sighted on the target with the iron sights, mounted the scope, selected the barrel insert, inserted the boresight into the barrel and then looked though the scope to try and find the laser dot to boresight off of. No dot in sight. I then reverted to a trick I used in the army when using similar laser boresights. I took a piece of paper and held it in front of the barrel to find the dot then started walking downrange to see where the dot was at. Luckily this is a visible instead of an IR laser so I did not need any NVG’s to fins the dot. Needless to say, the laser dot was roughly 10 target forms right of my aim point with my zeroed iron sights at 25m.

The unpackaged boresight ready for use
The unpackaged boresight ready for use

I initially thought that I had inserted the boresight incorrectly so I went back and checked it out, rotated the boresight in the bore to see if the laser would line up, I even got a guy waiting behind me in line to try the boresight in his 30 .06 and he got the same result. Then to top it all off, I thought maybe the rubber insert was not tight enough so I use the proved screwdriver to tighten it down a little bit and reinserted it into the rifle but was still nowhere near my known aim point. At this point I gave up and went to remove the boresight whereupon the rubber insert slipped off the small screw and became lodged in the barrel of my rifle. Luckily, I never go to the range without a cleaning kit and barrel rod so was able to push it out of the barrel whereupon I zeroed my scope the old fashioned way by pulling my zero target in close enough to get on the paper then making adjustments and firing at progressively longer ranges until I got it zeroed at my desired range of 150m.

A few things; I don’t expect a laser boresight dot to align with my aim point on a zeroed weapon, indeed I would be amazed if it did. I did however expect it to be somewhere in the ballpark maybe ½ to 1 target forms off of a zeroed aim point. It did not achieve that and thus was useless from the standpoint of boresighting my rifle. A boresight that does not align with the barrel is of no use. It gets one star because I cannot give it zero and at least the laser works even though it does not align with the barrel as it is supposed to do. You never know, I may just have gotten a defective boresight.
On the bright side, I can use the laser to irritate the neighbor’s cat since I certainly cannot use it to boresight a weapon as it was designed to do.

At first glance I thought this was going to be a good product. I finally got it out to the range this past weekend. The boresight comes with 4 different inserts that attach to the bore end of the scope to ensure a good fit in the barrel and accurate boresight. I got out to the range to boresight my .308 Remington 700 and the new scope I just got. I placed my rifle on the gun stand, sighted on the target with the iron sights, mounted the scope, selected the barrel insert, inserted the boresight into the barrel and then looked though the scope to try and find the laser dot to boresight off of. No dot in sight. I then reverted to a trick I used in the army when using similar laser boresights. I took a piece of paper and held it in front of the barrel to find the dot then started walking downrange to see where the dot was at. Luckily this is a visible instead of an IR laser so I did not need any NVG’s to fins the dot. Needless to say, the laser dot was roughly 10 target forms right of my aim point with my zeroed iron sights at 25m. I initially thought that I had inserted the boresight incorrectly so I went back and checked it out, I even got a guy waiting behind me in line to try the boresight in his 30 .06 and he got the same result. Then to top it all off, I thought maybe the rubber insert was not tight enough so I use the proved screwdriver to tighten it down a little bit and reinserted it into the rifle but was still nowhere near my known aim point. At this point I gave up and went to remove the boresight whereupon the rubber insert slipped off the small screw and became lodged in the barrel of my rifle. Luckily, I never go to the range without a cleaning kit and barrel rod so was able to push it out of the barrel whereupon I zeroed my scope the old fashioned way by pulling my zero target in close enough to get on the paper then making adjustments and firing at progressively longer ranges until I got it zeroed at my desired range of 150m.

A few things; I don’t expect a laser boresight dot to align with my aim point on a zeroed weapon, indeed I would be amazed if it did. I did however expect it to be somewhere in the ballpark maybe ½ to 1 target forms off of a zeroed aim point. It did not achieve that and thus was useless from the standpoint of boresighting my rifle. A boresight that does not align with the barrel is of no use. It gets one star because I cannot give it zero and at least the laser works even though it does not align with the barrel as it is supposed to do. You never know, I may just have gotten a defective boresight.

On the bright side, I can use the laser to irritate the neighbor’s cat since I certainly cannot use it to boresight a weapon as it was designed to do.

I initially posted this review on Amazon in early June, 2016 and within 24 hours the company that makes the boresight contacted me and offered to replace the product at their cost if I were willing to revise my review upon receipt of the new product.  I have not yet received the new boresight but when I do I will take it out ot the range and update both here and on Amazon.  At a minimum I am impressed with the responsiveness of the manufacturer.

Update # 1 29 June, 2016 – The seller contacted me after this review went live and offered to send me a free replacement which I just got in the mail yesterday. I plan on taking the new boresight out to the range in the next few weeks and try it out to see if it works any better than the first one I got. I will post another update then and perhaps change my rating depending on how it goes.

Final Update – 8 July, 2016 – I got the new boresight out, put it together, and tried to use it.  This boresight works.

Old and new boresights together
Old and new boresights together

First let me explain how a boresight works.  The boresight is supposed to help you align adjustable sights, whether open/iron or a scope, with the barrel of the weapon such that when you shoot using proper techniques you are closer to zero than starting from mechanical/manufacturer set zero or if you have somehow knocked your sights out of alignment.  Boresighting and zeroing are two entirely different things.  Zeroing aligns your sights, the way you hold the weapon, and your line of sight such that the strike of the bullet aligns with the iron sights or scope crosshairs.  A boresighted rifle is not zeroed, you still have to take the weapon out to the range and fine tune the alignment because it is very rare that mechanical and personal zero are the same thing, I have only ever known one person who could pick up a mechanically zeroed rifle and be zeroed herself.

View through the eyepiece of my scope, the laser dot did not show up as anything but a washed out part of the picture so I added a dot where the laser dot was at so you could see where the laser was in relation to the crosshairs of my scope
View through the eyepiece of my scope, the laser dot did not show up as anything but a washed out part of the picture so I added a dot where the laser dot was at so you could see where the laser was in relation to the crosshairs of my scope

I did not expect to boresight and go shoot hitting the x-ring every time without having to additionally zero the weapon.  As detailed above, my first experience with this boresight was disappointing to say the least.

I played around with it a bit because I still had problems and I think I have diagnosed the problem with it.  As stated above I have a Remington 700 in .308.  There are four different size rubber inserts that come with the boresight.  You are supposed to choose the appropriate size insert and screw it into the end of the boresighter so that the boresight has a tight fit and aligns properly with the barrel.  One of the problems with this is that in order to get a tight fit on my .308 I had to use the insert that says it is for .350-.434 cal weapons, the insert for .280-.349 cal just does not quite get tight enough to provide a stable seat in the barrel.  Given that .30 cal/7.62mm is one of the most common calibers in the world it floors me that they don’t have an insert for that caliber in the kit or at least one that I could buy separately.

Boresight inserted into the end of the barrel
Boresight inserted into the end of the barrel

Be that as it may, I selected the .350-.434 cal insert and screwed it very loosely onto the boresight and then put it into the barrel pushing until the boresight was firmly seated and had as little play around the end of the barrel as possible.  Then I turned it on.  I had my rifle on a gun rest to keep it stable and put the crosshairs of my already zeroed scope on the target.  Initially the dot was at least on the paper but several target forms left.  I rotated the boresight 90 degrees and it brought the dot ½ target form right and ½ target forms down from the aimpoint.  I assume I did not have it seated as tight as I should have at first and rotating the boresight seated it fully.  Since I am not going to adjust my sight I just wanted to confirm that the new boresight actually works.

I then went to remove the boresight from the barrel and the fun began.  Just like with the first one, the rubber insert popped off the screw on the boresight and stayed lodged in the barrel.  Not so bad this time as I was prepared for it and already had my cleaning rod put together and just pushed it out.  I will have to rod the barrel with patches a couple times to ensure there is no rubber caught in it but I can live with that.

Before insertion in the barrel
Before insertion in the barrel
After removing from the barrel.  Note the rubber insert pulled off the retaining screw
After removing from the barrel. Note the rubber insert pulled off the retaining screw

I started thinking about ways that the problem could be fixed and came up with two solutions.  The most obvious and probably cheapest fix from a manufacturer perspective to me would be to have small washers slightly smaller than the minimum caliber size of the inserts to ensure that the insert does not come off and lodge in the barrel.  The other would be to have exact caliber inserts available as additional purchase items.  This is not actually a bad piece of equipment and the price is just about unbeatable for a multi-caliber boresight.  A few modifications and this would easily get 5 stars.  I have adjusted my rating to 4 stars mainly because the first one I got was garbage and even with the second some patience and knowledge of actual boresighting procedures is necessary because the instructions are essentially worthless, and lastly because the inserts still get stuck in the barrel, which I find extremely annoying.

I have attached several pictures to the review.  The first two were in the original review and are of the boresight as I got it.  The 3rd is the old and new boresights together.  The 4th is the view through the eyepiece of my scope, the laser dot sis not show up as anything but a washed out part of the picture so I added a dot where the laser dot was at so you could see where the laser was in relation to the crosshairs of my scope.  The 5th is a picture of the boresight inserted into the end of the barrel. The 6th and 7th are picture of the rubber insert before and after I put the boresight into my rifle.  This is so you can see where it attaches and how it popped off the little retaining screw when I removed it from the rifle.

After all I have been through with this I now like it and think it is a good value for the price.  You do have to be aware that there may be issues with it and it requires a little finesse when using it, I finally got a serviceable boresight but it turned out to take longer and be more painful than I originally thought it would when I spotted this little bargain.